basketball_girl08 ([personal profile] basketball_girl08) wrote2013-06-03 01:19 am

Women Confronting War By Jennifer Turpin

The essay "Women Confronting War," by Jennifer Turpin explained how "war has a profound and unique effects on women" (324). Turpin focused on the wartime. She used a direct tone, targeting the public to acknowledge the suffering of the women around the world.

Turpin deeply engaged the audience to demonstrate the effect of war on women. I agree with what Turpin said, “men make war, women make peace” (324). Turpin used statistical evidences to illustrate the effect of war. She said during the war, “women..., are more likely to be killed in war than soldiers” (325). Women and children in war are the vast majority killed due to direct casualties by high-altitude and powerful bombings. Also, sexual violences such as prostitution and rape affected the women during the wartime. Women are raped all over the world, and “being young and pretty has very little to do with becoming a victim of wartime rape” (326). While wartime prostitution are done by young women to provide for their families, “or women who need[s] to support their children” (328). This shows the clear structure of logic informations how the wartime affected the women.

The appeal of pathos helped draw the audience in, to make the essay more effective. For example, the new technologies used in the war had a great impact on women, because this increased the percentage of civilian casualties from fifty percent in World War II to eighty percent in 1980s and ninety percent in 1990s of which the vast majority of these were women and their children. In addition, Turpin mentioned the sex violence against women. Knowing the fact that more than two million women were raped all over the world by the various soldiers. When these women becomes pregnant by the enemy’s, it “symbolizes the destruction of the community, ... forms [a] psychological torture knowing that you are carrying a child from the enemy, ... [and] may be shunned by their own families and communities” (326). It is devastating to know that the officials like the head of the U.N. mission in Cambodia and the commander of the United States Pacific Command turned blind eye to the women that suppose to be protected by “their” men. She mentioned how the “militaries around the world also support and may even enforce prostitution attached to their military installations” (327). The pathos made the essay more powerful and persuading, engaging the readers’ emotions such as sympathy and anger.

In conclusion, Turpin’s essay, “Women Confronting War” greatly captured myself as a reader. It opened my eyes to the horrifying effect of the war on women. The essay was straightforward and had convincing details that supports the significant examples that made the essay more powerful and created that vivid effect to myself and other readers. Although I wish Turpin could have maybe added solutions to how it should be engaged. Women had to bear so many sufferings and tortures during the wartime due to their gender and Turpin has achieved that purpose to raise awareness to this issue.

[personal profile] trubee 2013-06-03 11:12 pm (UTC)(link)
I agree with you that the appeal of pathos definitely engages the reader and effectively persuades the reader to make an agreement with the writer's main idea.